“How I Work”: Brandon Redlinger, Director of Growth at Engagio @Brandon_Lee_09 #HowIWork

May 10, 2018 Matt Heinz

By Matt Heinz, President of Heinz Marketing

For those who read our blog regularly (thank you!) you know each Thursday we feature B2B sales, marketing, and business leaders who tell in their own words, “How I Work”.  It’s inspired by Inc Magazine as well as via Lifehacker’s This Is How I Work Series.  We’ve had some amazing guest for the last few years.  You can catch up on everyone we’ve featured thus far in the “How I Work” series here.

This week I’m happy to feature Brandon Redlinger, Director of Growth at Engagio. Brandon is a wicked smart marketer who covers a ton of ground across numerous marketing (and sales) channels. Here in his own words is how he gets stuff done.

Location: San Mate, CA

Number of unread emails right now? 28 unread, 35 total in my inbox.

First app checked in the morning? It’s usually LinkedIn. I actively avoid email and Slack because it puts me in reactive mode and ruins my morning routine.

First thing you do when you come into work? Review my calendar for the day, and if I have time, update my weekly tasks/priorities on a sticky note. I use to prioritize daily in my notebook, but found that I was filling the pages with unnecessary tasks and I only updated it 1 or 2 times each week. But switching to stickies, it forces me to focus only on the few things that really matter.

What is your email management strategy? I follow some principles of Inbox Zero and Getting Things Done. As you can see, I’m not perfect, but as long as I don’t have 2 pages of email, I’m happy. I’ve noticed once emails overflow into a second page, I’m going to forget about them. So I guess my strategy is keep emails on one page.

Most essential app when traveling? The Apple podcast app. I’m always listening to podcasts, whether I’m traveling, working out or doing chores. Some of my favorite podcasts right now are The Way I Heard It, What Trump Can Teach Us About Conlaw, and You Are Not So Smart. Then I have my staples which I’ve listened to for ages: Tim Ferris Show, RadioLab and Freakonomics.

How do you keep yourself calm and/or focused? I wouldn’t consider myself a stoic, but I do follow and practice stoicism. It’s a great remidner of your humanity and keeps things in perspective.

What’s your perspective or approach to work/life balance? I find it very hard to separate work and life. I believe you should love what you do. I could work all day, everyday if I had to. But when I am spending time with my family or friends, I unplug from work completely. That means removing my email and slack from my phone. Everyone has to find their own balance but I think a fine distinction is this: if you work a lot and enjoy it, but you’re able to step away without anxiety and arrest, you have a healthy balance.

Are there any work rituals critical to your success? I have a daily 5-minute gratitude and mindfulness practice. I wouldn’t go as far as to label it meditation, but maybe I’ll get there someday.

What apps/software/tools can’t you live without? Engagio, Marketo, Salesforce, Slack, and LinkedIn.

What’s your workspace like? I was recently joking with my wife that if she or my mom walked into the Engagio offices, they’d be able to spot my desk instantly. There are some sports memorabilia and items on top of the desk and a pile of books on the floor. I tend to keep my workspace clean and organized with minimal distraction and clutter on my desk.

What’s your best time-saving shortcut or lifehack? Keyboard shortcuts. I can navigate my MacBook Pro, Gmail, Slack, etc. without having to touch my mouse. It makes me 10X quicker and so much more efficient while I work.

What are you currently reading? Primed to Perform and How To Measure Anything. I also read plenty of blogs. Some of my regulars are HBR, Farnam Street and First Round Review.

Last thing you do before leaving work? Most commonly, it’s probably email, then checking in with my team to make they’re supported and have everything they need from me.

Who are some mentors or influencers you wish to thank or acknowledge? Seth Braun and Jim Corcoran are two mentors that have had a major influence on me. I’m also a big believer of finding mentors from afar. You don’t have to meet with a mentor regularly or even know him/her personally. If there is someone you’d like to learn from, study everything they do. If they put out content – even better. Consume everything. Some of my mentors from afar are Tim Ferriss, Dan Kennedy and Morgan Brown.

Name some supportive people who help make it possible to do what you do best? Jon Miller – I’m honored that he asked me to come run content, digital and inbound marketing at Engagio. I’ve learned a lot from him, and it’s been a pleasure working for him. It’s also been a pleasure working with other extremely sharp marketers like Charlie Liang and Heidi Bullock.

What’s the best advice you’ve ever received? You are the average of the 5 people you spend the most time with. I deeply believe you have to choose your friends wisely. In the digital age, this also has further reaching implications. As I mentioned about finding mentors from afar, people you don’t know personally can have a tremendous impact on your life. I believe the 5 people you “spend the most time with” include the people you “spend time with” on social media. Who do you follow in twitter? Which creators do you watch regularly on YouTube? Who are you connected with on LinkedIn? It’s important to “spend time” with the right people.

Name a guilty pleasure TV show. Game of Thrones.

Fill in the Blank: I’d love to see BLANK answer these questions.  Ben Sardella

 

Whom would you nominate

The post “How I Work”: Brandon Redlinger, Director of Growth at Engagio @Brandon_Lee_09 #HowIWork appeared first on Heinz Marketing.

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